Tag Archives: memoir

Paris, I Love You but You’re Bringing Me Down by Rosecrans Baldwin

Paris, I Love You But You're Bringing Me DownParis, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down
Rosecrans Baldwin
Picador Paperback
On Sale: June 25, 2013

For a review copy (US and Canada only), or to schedule an interview with Rosecrans Baldwin, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com.

PRAISE FOR PARIS, I LOVE YOU
“Baldwin’s book is deftly written, with a wry style and liberally deployed irony. And it’s very funny.”The Atlantic

“A picture of what it’s like to live and work—like, work work—in a city understood by most Americans only through tourist goggles. It’s this balance of the city’s dirty deceptions…with the timeless elegance of every boulevard and back-alley bistro that makes the book feel so necessary and welcome.”GQ

“The most French book by an American author you’ll ever read…Baldwin’s writings on Paris are saturated with a bittersweet nostalgia for the present, living in a place he loves that he is fated to leave.”The Daily Beast

“Baldwin and his wife, Rachel—as well as the Parisians he came to know—are funny and idiosyncratic, and it’s a pleasure to spend time with them….A love story about the city and its people.”—NPR

“A charming, hilarious account of la vie Parisienne as experienced by an observant young American…his vivid impressions of Paris and its people (expats included) are most engaging. Great fun and surprisingly touching. Great fun and surprisingly touching.”Kirkus (starred review)

ABOUT PARIS, I LOVE YOU
Rosecrans Baldwin had always dreamed of living in Paris, ever since vacationing there when he was nine. So he couldn’t refuse an offer to work at a Parisian ad agency—even though he had no experience in advertising and hardly spoke French.

But the Paris that Rosecrans and his wife, Rachel, arrived in wasn’t the romantic city he remembered, and over the next eighteen months, his dogged American optimism was put to the test: at work (where he wrote booklets on breastfeeding), at home (in the hub of a massive construction project), and at every confusing dinner party in between. A hilarious and refreshingly honest take on life in one of the world’s most beloved cities, PARIS, I LOVE YOU BUT YOU’RE BRINGING ME DOWN is a book about a young man whose preconceptions are usurped by the oddities of a vigorous, nervy metropolis—which is just what he needs to fall in love with Paris a second time.

ABOUT ROSECRANS BALDWIN
ROSECRANS BALDWIN is the author of the novel You Lost Me There, an NPR Best Book of 2010 and a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice. He is a cofounder of the online magazine The Morning News. He lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
Cover image for download
Follow Rosecrans on Tumblr
Read an excerpt of PARIS, I LOVE YOU at GQ
Listen to Rosecrans on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show

Comments Off on Paris, I Love You but You’re Bringing Me Down by Rosecrans Baldwin

Filed under Memoir

Spring 2013

Here are the books I’m working on this spring. To request review copies or to inquire about an interview with the authors, please email me at gabrielle.gantz [@] picadorusa.com.

MAY

How to Change the World_CoverTitle: How to Change the World
Author: John-Paul Flintoff
Format: Paperback Original Series
On Sale: April 23, 2013

Description: We all want to live in a better world, but sometimes it feels that we lack the ability to make a difference. In HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD, author, broadcaster, and journalist John-Paul Flintoff offers a powerful reminder that through the generations society has been transformed by the actions of individuals who understood that if they didn’t like something they could change it. Combining fresh new insights from history, and other disciplines, this book will give you a sense of what might just be possible, as well as the inspiration and the courage you need to improve and change the world.

Author Bio: JOHN-PAUL FLINTOFF is an author, broadcaster and journalist. He has written several highly praised books. In one, Sew Your Own, he investigated sweat shops and global resource shortages. As a writer with the Financial Times and The Sunday Times, Flintoff has changed government policy, and raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for good causes. He lives in London. You can find him online at http://www.flintoff.org/

How to Find Fulfilling Work_CoverTitle: How to Find Fulfilling Work
Author: Roman Krznaric
Format: Paperback Original Series
On Sale: April 23, 2013

Description: The desire for fulfilling work is one of the great aspirations of our age. HOW TO FIND FULFILLING WORK explores the competing claims we face for money, status, and meaning in our lives. Drawing on wisdom from a variety of disciplines, cultural thinker Roman Krznaric sets out a practical guide to negotiating the labyrinth of choices, overcoming fear of change, and finding a career in which you thrive. Overturning a century of traditional thought about career change, Krznaric reveals just what it takes to find life-enhancing work.

Author Bio: ROMAN KRZNARIC is a cultural thinker and founding faculty member of The School of Life. He advises organizations including Oxfam and the United Nations on using empathy and conversation to create social change, and has been named by The Observer as one of Britain’s leading lifestyle philosophers. His works, including The Wonderbox: Curious Histories of How to Live and The First Beautiful Game: Stories of Obsession in Real Tennis, have been translated into over a dozen languages. You can find him online at http://www.romankrznaric.com.

This Is HowTitle: This is How: Surviving What You Think You Can’t
Author: Augusten Burroughs
Format: Paperback
On Sale: April 23, 2013

Description: If you’re fat and fail every diet, if you’re thin but can’t get thin enough, if you lose your job, if your child dies, if you are diagnosed with cancer, if you always end up with exactly the wrong kind of person, if you always end up alone, if you can’t get over the past, if your parents are insane and ruining your life, if you really and truly wish you were dead, if you feel like it’s your destiny to be a star, if you believe life has a grudge against you, if you don’t want to have sex with your spouse and don’t know why, if you feel so ashamed, if you’re lost in life. If you have ever wondered, how am I supposed to survive this? THIS IS HOW: Surviving What You Think You Can’t is a groundbreaking book by Augusten Burroughs that explores how to survive what you think you can’t.

Author Bio: AUGUSTEN BURROUGHS is the number one New York Times bestselling author of A Wolf at the Table, Possible Side Effects, Magical Thinking, Dry, Running with Scissors, and Sellevision. You can find him online at http://www.augusten.com.

DRY 10th AnniversaryTitle: Dry.: A Memoir (10th Anniversary Edition)
Author: Augusten Burroughs
Format: Paperback
On Sale: April 23, 2013

Description: You may not know it, but you’ve met Augusten Burroughs. You’ve seen him on the street, in bars, on the subway, at restaurants: a twenty-something guy, nice suit, works in advertising. Regular. Ordinary. But when the ordinary person had two drinks, Augusten was circling the drain by having twelve; when the ordinary person went home at midnight, Augusten never went home at all. Loud, distracting ties, automated wake-up calls and cologne on the tongue could only hide so much for so long… when Augusten is forced to examine himself, something actually starts to click and that’s when he finds himself in the worst trouble of all. What follows is a memoir that’s as moving as it is funny, as heartbreaking as it is true. DRY.: A Memoir is the story of love, loss, and Starbucks as a Higher Power.

Author Bio: AUGUSTEN BURROUGHS is the number one New York Times bestselling author of A Wolf at the Table, Possible Side Effects, Magical Thinking, Dry, Running with Scissors, and Sellevision. You can find him online at http://www.augusten.com/.

Hunger AngelTitle: The Hunger Angel
Author: Herta Müller
Format: Paperback
On Sale: April 30, 2013

Description: In her new novel, THE HUNGER ANGEL Nobel laureate Herta Müller calls upon her unique combination of poetic intensity and dispassionate precision to conjure the distorted world of the labor camp in all its physical and moral absurdity. She has given Leo the language to express the inexpressible, as hunger sharpens his senses into an acuity that is both hallucinatory and profound. In scene after disorienting scene, the most ordinary objects accrue tender poignancy as they acquire new purpose—a gramophone box serves as a suitcase, a handkerchief becomes a talisman, an enormous piece of casing pipe functions as a lovers’ trysting place. The heart is reduced to a pump, the breath mechanized to the rhythm of a swinging shovel, and coal, sand, and snow have a will of their own. Hunger becomes an insatiable angel who haunts the camp, but also a bare-knuckled sparring partner, delivering blows that keep Leo feeling the rawest connection to life.

Author Bio: HERTA MÜLLER is the winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Literature, as well as the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the European Literature Prize. She is the author of, among other books, The Land of Green Plums and The Appointment. Born in Romania in 1953, Müller lost her job as a teacher and suffered repeated threats after refusing to cooperate with Ceauşescu’s secret police. She succeeded in emigrating in 1987.

JUNE

Hanging GardenTitle: The Hanging Garden
Author: Patrick White
Format: Paperback Original
On Sale: May 28, 2013

Description: Patrick White, the most revered figure in modern Australian literature, born in England 1912 and raised in Australia, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1973. THE HANGING GARDEN is his first novel to be published in nearly 30 years.

THE HANGING GARDEN, transcribed posthumously from a handwritten manuscript, is a breathtaking and fully satisfying work that reads as a complete story.

Sydney, Australia, 1942. Two children, on the cusp of adolescence, have been spirited away from the war in Europe and given shelter in a house on Neutral Bay, taken in by the charity of an old widow who wants little to do with them. The boy, Gilbert, has escaped the Blitz. The girl, Eirene, lost her father in a Greek prison. Left to their own devices, the children forge a friendship of startling honesty, forming a bond of uncommon complexity which they sense will shape their destinies for years to come.

Author Bio: PATRICK WHITE was born in England 1912 and raised in Australia. He became the most revered figure in modern Australian literature, and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1973. He died in September 1990.

Love BombTitle: Love Bomb
Author: Lisa Zeidner
Format: Paperback
On Sale: May 28, 2013

Description: In quaint Haddonfield, New Jersey, Tess is about to marry Gabe in her childhood home. Her mother, Helen, is panicked about the guest list—which promises warring exes, racial tensions, and way too many psychiatrists. But the most challenging guest is uninvited: a woman in a wedding dress, wearing a gas mask and toting a sawed-off shotgun, with a bomb trigger strapped to her arm. While the warm, wise Helen attempts to control the hysteria, the hostages unravel their connections to their captor and to one another. Together, they await the arrival of the SWAT team—and the moment when “the terrorist of love” reveals her true motives.

Explosive, intelligent, and utterly uproarious, LOVE BOMB is at once a tough, tender social comedy and a romance with guts, written out of affection for everything it skewers.

Author Bio: LISA ZEIDNER has published four previous novels, including the critically acclaimed Layover, and two books of poems. Her stories, reviews, and essays have appeared in The New York Times, Slate, GQ, Tin House, and elsewhere. She is a professor in the MFA program in creative writing at Rutgers University. You can find her online at http://www.lisazeidner.com/.

JULY

How Should a Person BeTitle: How Should a Person Be?
Author: Sheila Heti
Format: Paperback
On Sale: June 25, 2013

Description: Hailed as “a breakthrough” (Chris Kraus, Los Angeles Review of Books) for the critically acclaimed Sheila Heti, HOW SHOULD A PERSON BE? is an unabashedly honest and hilarious tour through the unknowable pieces of one woman’s heart and mind. It has ignited conversation and earned Heti comparisons to Joan Didion, Henry Miller, Kathy Acker, and Gustave Flaubert.

Part literary novel, part self-help manual, and part bawdy exploration of the artistic impulse, it shocked and excited critics and readers with its raw, urgent depiction of female friendships and of the shape of our lives right now. In a novel “unlike any other,” Heti breathes new life into the essential questions: What is the most noble way to love? What kind of person should you be?

Author Bio: SHEILA HETI is the author of several books of fiction, including The Middle Stories and Ticknor; and an essay collection written with Misha Glouberman, The Chairs Are Where the People Go. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, Bookforum, McSweeney’s, n+1, and The Guardian, among other places. She works as interviews editor at The Believer magazine. You can find her online at http://www.sheilaheti.net/.

Paris, I Love You But You're Bringing Me DownTitle: Paris, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down
Author: Rosecrans Baldwin
Format: Paperback
On Sale: June 25, 2013

Description: Rosecrans Baldwin had always dreamed of living in Paris, ever since vacationing there when he was nine. So he couldn’t refuse an offer to work at a Parisian ad agency—even though he had no experience in advertising and hardly spoke French.

But the Paris that Rosecrans and his wife, Rachel, arrived in wasn’t the romantic city he remembered, and over the next eighteen months, his dogged American optimism was put to the test: at work (where he wrote booklets on breastfeeding), at home (in the hub of a massive construction project), and at every confusing dinner party in between. A hilarious and refreshingly honest take on life in one of the world’s most beloved cities, PARIS, I LOVE YOU is a book about a young man whose preconceptions are usurped by the oddities of a vigorous, nervy metropolis—which is just what he needs to fall in love with Paris a second time.

Author Bio: ROSECRANS BALDWIN is the author of the novel You Lost Me There, an NPR Best Book of 2010 and a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice. He is a cofounder of the online magazine The Morning News.

Desert AmericaTitle: Desert America: Boom and Bust in the New Old West
Author: Rubén Martínez
Format: Paperback
On Sale: June 25, 2013

Description: The economic boom was writ nowhere as large as on the West. Over the past decade, the most iconic of American landscapes has undergone a political and demographic upheaval comparable only to the opening of the frontier. In DESERT AMERICA, a work of powerful reportage and memoir, acclaimed author Rubén Martínez explores a world of extremes: drug addiction flourishing in the shadow of some of America’s richest zip codes, a race war near the banks of the Rio Grande, and Native Americans hunting down Mexican migrants crossing the most desolate stretch of the border.

Author Bio: RUBÉN MARTÍNEZ, an Emmy-winning journalist and poet, is the author of Crossing Over and The New Americans. He holds the Fletcher Jones Chair in Literature and Writing at Loyola Marymount University.

Crossing OverTitle: Crossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail
Author: Rubén Martínez
Format: Paperback
On Sale: June 25, 2013

Description: In the decade since CROSSING OVER first appeared, illegal immigration from Mexico has only become more fraught and more lethal, the rallying cry of nativist politics and a pawn in the war on terror. Yet the U.S.-Mexican border remains one of the most permeable boundaries in the world, breached daily by Mexicans in search of work. Thousands die crossing the line, and those who reach “the other side” are branded as illegals, undocumented and unprotected.

Following the exodus of the Chávez clan, an extended Mexican family who lost three sons in a tragic border accident, Martínez traces the migrants’ progress from their small southern-Mexican town of Cherán to California, Wisconsin, and Missouri. Far from joining the melting pot, Martínez argues, the seven million migrants in the U.S. are creating a new culture that is dramatically altering both Mexico and the United States.

Hailed as “valuable,” “passionate,” and “terrific,” Crossing Over puts a human face on the phenomenon of Mexican immigration, and remains a beautifully written classic of our time.

Author Bio: RUBÉN MARTÍNEZ, an Emmy-winning journalist and poet, is the author of Crossing Over and The New Americans. He holds the Fletcher Jones Chair in Literature and Writing at Loyola Marymount University.

AUGUST

We SinnersTitle: We Sinners
Author: Hanna Pylväinen
Format: Paperback
On Sale: July 23, 2013

Description: Despite the extent to which each of the Rovaniemis lives are built around their church—music, television, makeup, and even school dances are strictly prohibited—their places in the wider world and their paths to get there could not be more different. Through alternating perspectives, Pylväinen captures each singular Rovaniemi voice deftly, seamlessly, delivering their individual struggles both in and outside of the church.

Author Bio: HANNA PYLVÄINEN graduated from Mount Holyoke College and received her MFA from the University of Michigan, where she was also a Zell Postgraduate Fellow. She is the recipient of a MacDowell Colony residency, a fellowship at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, and a 2012 Whiting Award. You can find her online at http://www.hannapylvainen.com/.

SubversivesTitle: Subversives: The FBI’s War on Student Radicals, and Reagan’s Rise to Power
Author: Seth Rosenfeld
Format: Paperback
On Sale: July 23, 2013

Description: SUBVERSIVES traces the FBI’s secret involvement with three iconic figures at Berkeley during the 1960s: the ambitious neophyte politician Ronald Reagan, the fierce but fragile radical Mario Savio, and the liberal university president Clark Kerr. Through their converging narratives, the award-winning investigative reporter Seth Rosenfeld tells a dramatic and disturbing story of FBI surveillance, illegal break-ins, infiltration, planted news stories, poison-pen letters, and secret detention lists.

The FBI spent more than one million dollars trying to block the release of the secret files on which SUBVERSIVES is based. This is an extraordinary view of what the government was up to during a turning point in our nation’s history.
Author Bio: SETH ROSENFELD was for many years an investigative reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, where his article about the FBI and the Free Speech Movement won seven national awards. You can find him online at http://www.sethrosenfeld.com/.

Comments Off on Spring 2013

Filed under Season Roundup

When Women Were Birds: Fifty-four Variations on Voice by Terry Tempest Williams

When Women Were BirdsWHEN WOMEN WERE BIRDS: Fifty-four Variations on Voice
Terry Tempest Williams
Picador / $15.00 / 256 pages
On Sale: February 26, 2013
Memoir

For review copies (US and Canada only), or to schedule an interview with Terry Tempest Williams, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com

PRAISE FOR WHEN WOMEN WERE BIRDS
“The writing of Terry Tempest Williams is brilliant, meditative, and full of surprises, wisdom, and wonder. She’s one of those writers who changes peoples’ lives by encouraging attention and a slow, patient awakening.”—Anne Lamott, author of Imperfect Birds

“Williams displays a Whitmanesque embrace of the world and its contradictions…As the pages accumulate, her voice grows in majesty and power until it become a full-fledged aria.”San Francisco Chronicle

“Williams narrates stories that range wide and run deep . . . Here, readers get a Terry Tempest Williams who is at the top of her game, the master of her craft . . . a gift from a writer who knows how to split the world open.”—Cheryl Strayed, Orion

“This poetic memoir continues the work Williams began in Refuge….Williams explores her mother’s identity—woman, wife, mother, and Mormon—as she continues to honor her memory….A lyrical and elliptical meditation on women, nature, family, and history.”—The Boston Globe

“Williams is the kind of writer who makes a reader feel that [her] voice might also, one day, be heard….She cancels out isolation: Connections are woven as you sit in your chair readingbetween you and the place you live, between you and other readers, you and the writer. Without knowing how it happened, your sense of home is deepened.”Susan Salter Reynolds, The Daily Beast

ABOUT WHEN WOMEN WERE BIRDS
“I am leaving you all my journals, but you must promise me you won’t look at them until after I’m gone.” This is what Terry Tempest Williams’s mother, the matriarch of a large Mormon clan in northern Utah, told her a week before she died. It was a shock to Williams to discover that her mother had kept journals. But not as much of a shock to discover that the three shelves of journals were all blank.

In WHEN WOMEN WERE BIRDS: Fifty-four Variations on Voice (Picador / On Sale: February 26, 2013 / ISBN: 978-1-250-02411-4 / $15.00), Williams recounts memories of her mother, ponders her own Mormon faith, and contemplates the notion of absence in art and in our world. WHEN WOMEN WERE BIRDS is a carefully crafted kaleidoscope that keeps turning around the question: What does it mean to have a voice?

ABOUT TERRY TEMPEST WILLIAMS
TERRY TEMPEST WILLIAMS
is the author of fourteen books, including Refuge, Leap, The Open Space of Democracy, and most recently, Finding Beauty in a Broken World. The recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship and a Lannan Literary Fellowship in creative nonfiction, she divides her time between Castle Valley, Utah, and Moose, Wyoming.

MORE INFORMATION
Cover Image for Download
Terry Tempest Williams on To The Best Of Our Knowledge

Comments Off on When Women Were Birds: Fifty-four Variations on Voice by Terry Tempest Williams

Filed under Memoir

The Guardians: An Elegy for a Friend by Sarah Manguso

The GuardiansThe Guardians: An Elegy for a Friend
Sarah Manguso
Picador / $15.00 / 128 pages
On Sale: March 5, 2013
Memoir / Health / Mental Health

For review copies (US and Canada only), or to schedule an interview with Sarah Manguso, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com

PRAISE FOR THE GUARDIANS
“Memoirs about grief often concern a relative or partner, but Manguso’s offers a revealing perspective on simple friendship and on a formative period of early adulthood when choices are made and selfhood solidifies.”—The New Yorker

“‘Nobody understands how I feel,’ we often think (mistakenly) in times of loss. But Manguso not only understands, she can articulate it in the precisest and most unexpected of images—an unrelated car accident, a bowl of Italian candies, a swim in the ocean. What results is a memoir that reveals not the just intimacies of the writer’s life, but of your own. Most moving is that The Guardians covers a subject so rarely recognized in our society, the grief from the death of a friend.”—Leigh Newman, Oprah.com, “Book of the Week”

“Sarah Manguso’s The Guardians goes to hell and back . . . The book majors in bone-on-bone rawness, exposed nerve endings . . . With The Guardians, I did something I do when I love a book: start covering my mouth when I read; this is very pure and elemental, and I wanted nothing coming between me and the page.”—David Shields, Los Angeles Review of Books

“A bittersweet elegy to a friend who ‘eloped’ from a locked psychiatric ward . . . [Manguso] explores the extent to which we are our friends’ guardians and, in outliving them, the guardians of their memory . . . Manguso’s writing manages, in carefully honed bursts of pointed, poetic observation, to transcend the darkness and turn it into something beautiful. The results are also deeply instructive, not in the manner we’ve come to fatuously call “self-help” but in the way that good literature expands and illuminates our realm of experience.”—Heller McAlpin, Barnes and Noble Review

“Shortly after returning home from a fellowship year in Rome, poet and memoirist Sarah Manguso received word that her old college friend Harris had fled a psychiatric hospital and jumped in front of a train. In The Guardians: An Elegy, the writer explores, in prose that singes with precision and honesty, the many ambiguities surrounding the tragedy . . . A long friendship is a crucial orientation point, and Manguso captures with great delicacy the spinning compass of her grief, and its accompanying jumble of anger, disappointments, corrupted memories—and love.”—Megan O’Grady, Vogue

“Packs an emotional wallop into small, patterned movements.”—The A.V. Club

“In The Guardians, Sarah Manguso holds up two kinds of love: the love for someone willfully at one’s side (the new husband) and the love for someone willfully gone (the dear friend, a suicide). The limitations and complexities of romantic love played out in the present are here haunted on all sides by the simple expansiveness of platonic love, especially as seen through the lens of mourning. The living cannot compete with the dead. But marriage has its rights before any friendship. The mystery of where Manguso’s heart will land propels us through this vivid meditation.”—Sheila Heti, author of How Should a Person Be?

“Sarah Manguso’s is a disarming and yet infectiously charming style, one that mixes intimate personal reflection with curiously distanced observations of the world. What this ends up feeling like while reading The Guardians is a tension that’s both inviting and simultaneously alienating, a wounded sort of intellect that wants to protect and yet expose itself to the reader. It’s a beautifully sad meditation—as exhilarating as it is devastating.”—John D’Agata, author of About a Mountain

“Manguso is a deliberate and exact stylist….At her best, she has some of Didion’s rhythms, her watchfulness and remove, her way of drawing attention to her own fragility….A fiercely personal book.”—The Cleveland Plain Dealer

ABOUT THE GUARDIANS
“An unidentified white man was struck and instantly killed by a Metro-North train last night,” reported the July 24, 2008, edition of the Riverdale Press. This man was named Harris, and The Guardians—written in the years after he escaped from a psychiatric hospital and ended his life—is Sarah Manguso’s heartbreaking elegy.

Harris was a man who “played music, wrote software, wrote music, learned to drive, went to college, went to bed with girls.” In The Guardians, Manguso grieves not for family or for a lover, but for a best friend. With startling humor and candor, she paints a portrait of a friendship between a man and a woman—in all its unexpected detail—and shows that love and grief do not always take the shapes we expect them to.

ABOUT SARAH MANGUSO
Sarah Manguso is the author of a memoir, The Two Kinds of Decay; two books of poetry, Siste Viator and The Captain Lands in Paradise; and a short-story collection, Hard to Admit and Harder to Escape.

MORE INFORMATION
Cover image for download
Sarah Manguso’s website

Comments Off on The Guardians: An Elegy for a Friend by Sarah Manguso

Filed under Health, Memoir

Some of My Lives: A Scrapbook Memoir by Rosamond Bernier

Some of My Lives: A Scrapbook Memoir
Rosamond Bernier
On sale: November 27, 2012 (December)
Essays / Memoir / Art

For a review copy (US and Canada only) or to schedule an interview with Rosamond Bernier, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com

PRAISE FOR SOME OF MY LIVES
Some of My Lives: A Scrapbook Memoir, animated by Bernier’s inimitable voice and charm, includes encounters with countless luminaries from the worlds of art and style.…Her razor-sharp insights, playful humor, and deep humility throw the colorful personalities surrounding her into high relief.”Vogue

“[Bernier’s] charm, wit, and style are apparent….She doesn’t just give names; she provides the details that reveal someone’s personality….She turned being social into a kind of art.”The New York Times Book Review

“Bernier proves an able guide across a wide range of forms, from painting and sculpture to architecture and fashion. Her interview with Coco Chanel is brilliant….She has provided a very stylish memoir indeed.”
The Plain Dealer

“These are scrumptious essays, not only because they chronicle extraordinary adventures of artistic and historical significance but also because they are so wise, archly offhand, and alight with a passion for living and learning.”—Booklist (starred review)

“An inimitable life captured with spirited, winning immediacy.”—Kirkus

ABOUT SOME OF MY LIVES
Rosamond Bernier has known many (one is tempted to say all) of the greatest artists and composers of the twentieth century. In SOME OF MY LIVES (Picador / On Sale: November 27, 2012), she has made a kind of literary scrapbook from an extraordinary array of writings, ranging from scholarly articles for American publications to her many contributions to the art journal L’OEIL, which she cofounded in 1955.

Through the stories of her encounters with Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Leonard Bernstein, Max Ernst, Aaron Copeland, Malcolm Lowry, and Karl Lagerfeld, we come to understand the sheer richness of Bernier’s experiences and memories. Pithy, hilarious, and wise, SOME OF MY LIVES is a multifaceted self-portrait of a life informed and surrounded by the arts.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Rosamond Bernier
was born in Philadelphia and was educated in France, England, and America. In 1955, she cofounded the influential art magazine L’OEIL, which featured the works of the masters of the School of Paris. A renowned lecturer at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rosamond Bernier was named for life to the International Best-Dressed List.

MORE INFORMATION
Cover image for download
Read an excerpt

Comments Off on Some of My Lives: A Scrapbook Memoir by Rosamond Bernier

Filed under Essays, Memoir

Alibis: Essays on Elsewhere by André Aciman

Alibis: Essays on Elsewhere
André Aciman
On Sale: November 27, 2012 (December)
Picador
Essays / Travel / Culture

For a review copy (US and Canada only) or to schedule an interview with André Aciman, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com

PRAISE FOR ALIBIS
“A beautiful new book of essays…Aciman’s deep fidelity to the world of the senses, and to the translation of those sensations into prose, makes Alibis a delight.”—Teju Cole, The New York Times Book Review

“The journey is always beguiling and its conclusion often poignant….Aciman is a brilliant chronicler of ‘the disconnect, the hiatus, the tiny synapse’ between who we are and who—or where—we wish we might have been.”The Wall Street Journal

“André Aciman is, quite simply, one of the finest essayists of the last hundred years—you’d have to go back much farther…to find the combination of elegance, restraint, and longing that Aciman so generously bestows upon his readers.”Los Angeles Review of Books

ABOUT ALIBIS
André Aciman first rose to prominence with Out of Egypt—a finely wrought memoir of his childhood in Alexandria—and in the fifteen years since, his reputation has only grown. He has been lauded as an editor, essayist, and critic, and as a scholar of French literature and the director of the Writers Institute at the City University of New York. More recently, Aciman has also earned widespread praise as a novelist. When his debut novel, Call Me by Your Name was published in 2007, New York magazine declared him “the most exciting new fiction writer of the 21st century,” raving that “few novels since Proust’s In Search of Lost Time are this adept at capturing the nuances of human emotion.” And writing last year in The New York Review of Books, Michael Dirda called Aciman’s second novel, Eight White Nights, “a bravura re-creation of all the feints and counterfeints, yearnings and frustrations, of modern courtship.”

In ALIBIS (Picador Paperback / On sale: November 27, 2012), André Aciman has written a luminous series of linked essays about time, place, identity, and art that show him at his very finest. From beautiful and moving pieces about the memories evoked by the scent of lavender; to meditations on cities such as Barcelona, Rome, Paris, and New York; to life secrets unearthed from an ordinary street corner, ALIBIS reminds us that Aciman is a master of the personal essay.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
André Aciman is the author of Eight White Nights, Call Me by Your Name, Out of Egypt, and False Papers, and is the editor of The Proust Project. He teaches comparative literature at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

MORE INFORMATION
Cover image for download
André Aciman on writing (New York Times Opinionator)

Comments Off on Alibis: Essays on Elsewhere by André Aciman

Filed under Essays

My Korean Deli: Risking It All for a Convenience Store by Ben Ryder Howe

My Korean Deli: Risking It All for a Convenience Store
Ben Ryder Howe
On Sale: March 2012
Memoir

This warm and funny tale of an earnest preppy editor finding himself trapped behind the counter of a Brooklyn convenience store is about family, culture, and identity in an age of discombobulation.

It starts with a gift, when Ben Ryder Howe’s wife, the daughter of Korean immigrants, decides to repay her parents’ self-sacrifice by buying them a store. Howe, an editor at the rarefied Paris Review, agrees to go along. Things soon become a lot more complicated. After the business struggles, Howe finds himself living in the basement of his in-laws’ Staten Island home, commuting to the Paris Review offices in George Plimpton’s Upper East Side townhouse by day, and heading to Brooklyn at night to slice cold cuts and peddle lottery tickets. My Korean Deli follows the store’s tumultuous life span, and along the way paints the portrait of an extremely unlikely partnership between characters with shoots across society, from the Brooklyn streets to Seoul to Puritan New England. Owning the deli becomes a transformative experience for everyone involved as they struggle to salvage the original gift—and the family—while sorting out issues of values, work, and identity.

Ben Ryder Howe has written for The New YorkerThe Atlantic Monthly, andOutside, and his work has been selected for Best American Travel Writing. He is a former senior editor of The Paris Review. He, his wife, and their two children live on Staten Island. This is his first book.

Read more: Includes excerpt

Review copies are limited, please email Gabrielle.Gantz [at] Picadorusa.com for availability.

Comments Off on My Korean Deli: Risking It All for a Convenience Store by Ben Ryder Howe

Filed under Memoir