Monthly Archives: May 2013

Desert America: A Journey Through Our Most Divided Landscape by Rubén Martínez

Desert AmericaDesert America: A Journey Through Our Most Divided Landscape
Rubén Martínez
Picador Paperback
On sale: June 25

For a review copy (US and Canada only), or to schedule an interview with Rubén Martínez, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com.

PRAISE FOR DESERT AMERICA
“It’s hard to imagine a more engaging and illuminating chronicle of the contemporary West….A nuanced, conflicted, poetic meditation on an endlessly elusive subject.”San Francisco Chronicle

“Deeply moving and insightful…A memoir that also manages to be an excellent work of reportage… Martínez treats all the people he writes about, and the places where they live, with the kind of profound respect all too rare among the legions of Western writers who have preceded him. The result is an emotional and intellectually astute portrait of communities long neglected and misunderstood by American literature.”Los Angeles Times

“A compelling and daring book, one filled with equal parts confession, history, and politics…Desert America will challenge every idea you may have formed about life and death in our Western deserts.”
Los Angeles Review of Books

ABOUT DESERT AMERICA
The economic boom—and the devastation left in its wake—was writ nowhere as large as on the American West. Over the past decade, the most iconic of American landscapes has undergone a political and demographic upheaval comparable only to the opening of the frontier. In DESERT AMERICA, a work of powerful reportage and memoir, acclaimed author Rubén Martínez explores a world of extremes: drug addiction flourishing in the shadow of some of America’s richest zip codes, an exclusive Texas enclave that coexists with bloodshed on the banks of the Rio Grande, and Native Americans hunting down Mexican migrants crossing the most desolate stretch of the border.

DESERT AMERICA details Martinez’s own love for this most contested region and reveals that the great frontier is now in the forefront of the vast disparities that are redefining the very idea of America.

ABOUT RUBEN MARTINEZ
Rubén Martínez, an Emmy-winning journalist and poet, is the author of Crossing Over and The New Americans. He holds the Fletcher Jones Chair in Literature and Writing at Loyola Marymount University.

MORE INFORMATION
Cover image for download
Visit Rubén Martínez’s website

ALSO AVAILABLE
Crossing OverCrossing Over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail
Now with a new afterword
Picador Paperback
On sale: June 25

PRAISE FOR CROSSING OVER
“Beautifully written and important…Martínez shows us how ‘America’ is being reimagined by its uninvited, its disrespected, its invisible, and he shows us that they will change us, whether we like it or not.”Los Angeles Times

“To read Crossing Over is to read the story of America, to understand the dynamic that renews the strength of the American Dream….Martínez has depicted a deep, enduring commonality that may change the way we understand immigration”Chicago Tribune

“Martínez’s portrait is a rich counterpoint to the simple patterns a demographer might draw.”The New York Times Book Review

ABOUT CROSSING OVER
The U.S.-Mexican border is one of the most permeable boundaries in the world, breached daily by Mexicans in search of work. Yet the migrant gambit is perilous. Thousands die crossing the line and those who reach “the other side” are branded illegals, undocumented and unprotected.

In CROSSING OVER, Ruben Martinez puts a human face on the phenomenon, following the exodus of the Chávez clan, an extended Mexican family with the grim distinction of having lost three sons in a tragic border incident. He charts the migrants’ progress from their small south-Mexican town of Cherán through the harrowing underground railroad to the tomato farms of Missouri, the strawberry fields of California, and the slaughterhouses of Wisconsin. He reveals the effects of immigration on the family left behind and offers a powerful portrait of migrant culture, an exchange that deposits hip hop in Indian villages while bringing Mexican pop to the northern plains. Far from joining the melting pot, Martinez argues, the migrants–as many as seven million in the U.S.–are spawning a new culture that will alter both countries as Latin America and the U.S. come increasingly to resemble each other.

MORE INFORMATION
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Filed under Current Events / Politics

Paris, I Love You but You’re Bringing Me Down by Rosecrans Baldwin

Paris, I Love You But You're Bringing Me DownParis, I Love You But You’re Bringing Me Down
Rosecrans Baldwin
Picador Paperback
On Sale: June 25, 2013

For a review copy (US and Canada only), or to schedule an interview with Rosecrans Baldwin, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com.

PRAISE FOR PARIS, I LOVE YOU
“Baldwin’s book is deftly written, with a wry style and liberally deployed irony. And it’s very funny.”The Atlantic

“A picture of what it’s like to live and work—like, work work—in a city understood by most Americans only through tourist goggles. It’s this balance of the city’s dirty deceptions…with the timeless elegance of every boulevard and back-alley bistro that makes the book feel so necessary and welcome.”GQ

“The most French book by an American author you’ll ever read…Baldwin’s writings on Paris are saturated with a bittersweet nostalgia for the present, living in a place he loves that he is fated to leave.”The Daily Beast

“Baldwin and his wife, Rachel—as well as the Parisians he came to know—are funny and idiosyncratic, and it’s a pleasure to spend time with them….A love story about the city and its people.”—NPR

“A charming, hilarious account of la vie Parisienne as experienced by an observant young American…his vivid impressions of Paris and its people (expats included) are most engaging. Great fun and surprisingly touching. Great fun and surprisingly touching.”Kirkus (starred review)

ABOUT PARIS, I LOVE YOU
Rosecrans Baldwin had always dreamed of living in Paris, ever since vacationing there when he was nine. So he couldn’t refuse an offer to work at a Parisian ad agency—even though he had no experience in advertising and hardly spoke French.

But the Paris that Rosecrans and his wife, Rachel, arrived in wasn’t the romantic city he remembered, and over the next eighteen months, his dogged American optimism was put to the test: at work (where he wrote booklets on breastfeeding), at home (in the hub of a massive construction project), and at every confusing dinner party in between. A hilarious and refreshingly honest take on life in one of the world’s most beloved cities, PARIS, I LOVE YOU BUT YOU’RE BRINGING ME DOWN is a book about a young man whose preconceptions are usurped by the oddities of a vigorous, nervy metropolis—which is just what he needs to fall in love with Paris a second time.

ABOUT ROSECRANS BALDWIN
ROSECRANS BALDWIN is the author of the novel You Lost Me There, an NPR Best Book of 2010 and a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice. He is a cofounder of the online magazine The Morning News. He lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
Cover image for download
Follow Rosecrans on Tumblr
Read an excerpt of PARIS, I LOVE YOU at GQ
Listen to Rosecrans on WNYC’s Leonard Lopate Show

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Filed under Memoir

How Should a Person Be? by Sheila Heti

How Should a Person BeHow Should a Person Be?
Sheila Heti
Picador Paperback
Publication Date: June 25, 2013

For a review copy (US and Canada only), or to schedule an interview with Sheila Heti, please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com.

PRAISE FOR HOW SHOULD A PERSON BE?
“A vital and funny picture of the excitements and longueurs of trying to be a young creator in a free, late-capitalist Western city.”
—James Wood, The New Yorker

“Funny…odd, original, and nearly unclassifiable…unlike any novel I can think of.”
—David Haglund, The New York Times Book Review

“Brutally honest and stylistically inventive, cerebral, and sexy.”
San Francisco Chronicle

“One of the bravest, strangest, most original novels I’ve read this year.”
The Boston Globe

ABOUT HOW SHOULD A PERSON BE?
By turns loved and reviled upon its U.S. publication, Sheila Heti’s “breakthrough novel” (Chris Kraus, Los Angeles Review of Books) is an unabashedly honest and hilarious tour through the unknowable pieces of one woman’s heart and mind. Part literary novel, part self-help manual, and part vivid exploration of the artistic and sexual impulse, HOW SHOULD A PERSON BE? earned Heti comparisons to Henry Miller, Joan Didion, Mary McCarthy, and Flaubert, while shocking and exciting readers with its raw, urgent depiction of female friendship and of the shape of our lives now. Irreverent, brilliant, and completely original, Heti challenges, questions, frustrates, and entertains in equal measure. With urgency and candor she asks: What is the most noble way to love? What kind of person should you be?

ABOUT SHEILA HETI
Sheila Heti is the author of several books of fiction, including The Middle Stories and Ticknor; and an essay collection written with Misha Glouberman, The Chairs Are Where the People Go. Her writing has been translated into ten languages and her work has appeared in The New York Times, Bookforum, McSweeney’s, n+1, The Guardian, and other places. She works as interviews editor at The Believer magazine.

FOR MORE INFORMATION
Cover image for download
Visit Sheila Heti’s website
Listen to an interview with Sheila on KCRW’s Bookworm
Read an interview with Sheila at The Rumpus
Read an interview with Sheila at Bomb Magazine

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Filed under Fiction, Literary

The Hanging Garden by Patrick White

Hanging GardenThe Hanging Garden
Patrick White
A Picador Paperback Original
Publication Date: May 28, 2013

For a review copy (US and Canada only) please email gabrielle.gantz [at] picadorusa.com.

The first novel by White to be published in nearly thirty years.

PRAISE FOR THE HANGING GARDEN
“[The Hanging Garden is] a complete, complex, and beautiful portrait, an important addition to classic contemporary fiction.”Publishers Weekly (starred review)

“Like all great impressionistic artists, Patrick White recreates the world by depicting the life we think we know in an entirely original and luminous way. Everything about The Hanging Garden, his final novel, is thrilling, consummate, and revelatory. Its belated publication is a rare and wonderful gift to White devotees and a perfect introduction for new readers.”
—Peter Cameron, author of Coral Glynn and Someday This Pain Will Be Useful to You

“Atmospheric and unsettling. White’s writing is infused with a powerful sense of yearning and loss. A book poignant with the uncertainty and bewilderment of childhood’s passing.”
—Tan Twan Eng, author of The Garden of Evening

“White’s novels [are] boldly ambitious, inventive, sensual, eloquent…shrewd and tender about its two protagonists.”The Spectator (London)

“The late, virtuosic performance of a master. Here is White conjuring in 200 pages one of the most vivid, erotically charged, emotionally wrenching works of fiction, I’ve read this century.”The Age (Australia)

The Hanging Garden returns fiction to greatness. Reading it brings exhilaration, tinged with dismay at our diminished expectations of the literary novel….A gift.”The Monthly (Australia)

ABOUT THE HANGING GARDEN
From the Nobel Prize-Winning author of The Eye of the Storm comes a vivid, visceral tale of childhood friendship and sexual awakening from beyond the echoes of World War II.

Patrick White, the most revered figure in modern Australian literature, born in England 1912 and raised in Australia, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1973. THE HANGING GARDEN is his first novel to be published in nearly 30 years.

THE HANGING GARDEN, transcribed posthumously from a handwritten manuscript, is a breathtaking and fully satisfying work that reads as a complete story.

Seamlessly shifting among points of view, and written in dazzling prose, White’s mastery of style and highly inventive storytelling transports readers as few writers can.

Sydney, Australia, 1942. Two children, on the cusp of adolescence, have been spirited away from the war in Europe and given shelter in a house on Neutral Bay, taken in by the charity of an old widow who wants little to do with them. The boy, Gilbert, has escaped the Blitz. The girl, Eirene, lost her father in a Greek prison. Left to their own devices, the children forge a friendship of startling honesty, forming a bond of uncommon complexity which they sense will shape their destinies for years to come.

ABOUT PATRICK WHITE
PATRICK WHITE was born in England 1912 and raised in Australia. He became the most revered figure in modern Australian literature, and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1973. He died in September 1990.

MORE INFORMATION
Patrick White’s Picador page
Cover image for download

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Filed under Fiction, Literary